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Linux Issues

Featuring 16 Papers as of August 10, 2015

  • Securing Linux Containers by Major Hayden - August 10, 2015 

    The components that make Linux containers possible have been available for several years, but recent projects, such as LXC and Docker, have made the technology much more accessible to users. Containers allow for even more efficient utilization of server resources through greater density and faster provisioning. However, securing containers is much more challenging than traditional virtualization methods, including KVM. The isolation layer between the container and the kernel, as well as between each container, is extremely thin. Weaknesses in the kernel or the container configuration can lead to compromises of containers or the entire system. The responsibility of managing the operating system within the container can also become blurry with time, and that can also lead to compromises of the container. Fortunately, Linux security modules, such as SELinux and AppArmor, along with careful configuration and container operating system management, can strengthen the thin walls around each container. Organizations that use mature Dev/Ops practices can also improve security within each container by automating the creation and deployment of container images. This paper will discuss the best strategies for securing a system running containers and the trade-offs that come with each.

  • Securing Blackboard Learn on Linux by David Lyon - December 1, 2011 

    Blackboard Learn (Bb Learn) is an application suite providing educational technology to facilitate online, web based learning. It is typical to see Bb Learn hosting courses and content. Common add-ons include the Community and Content systems which are licensed separately.

  • Hardening Debian 4.0 Creating a simple and solid foundation for your applications by Alexandre Dery - January 14, 2008 

    Any operating system is vulnerable to attacks if it's not properly configured. People get really emotional about the security of their preferred operating system: every mildly technical forum is bound to be a battle ground for flame wars between OS lovers. But the bottom line is: company politics and policies aside, whatever the operating system is, its security depends mainly on the knowledge of its administrator. Debate all you want, but even an OpenBSD server will be hacked if its administrator has no clue!

  • NFS Security in Both Trusted and Untrusted Environments by Jakub Dlugolecki - November 1, 2007 

    This paper describes risks of using NFSv3 and NFSv4 in environments where performance is considered to be a more important factor than security. The paper also describes ways to mitigate those risks.

  • Secure Network Configuration Management for Linux based Routers by Ron Young - May 5, 2005 

    This paper presents a detailed implementation and operation plan for remote configuration management of a research network infrastructure. GIAC University is currently involved with several large-scale research projects that utilize individually identifiable medical records.

  • Step by Step Installation of a Secure Linux Web, DNS and Mail Server by John Holbrook - April 8, 2004 

    This paper will show how the author configured a Linux based web and e-mail server for a small company. This server is co-located at a local ISP. Because of budget limitations, the company can only locate one physical box at the ISP which limits what security measures that can be installed.

  • Linux Kernel Hardening by Taylor Merry - December 21, 2003 

    This paper outlines the installation and configuration of a Grsecurity-enhanced kernel.

  • Linux Process Containment - A practical look at chroot and User Mode by Paul Lessard - June 3, 2003 

    This document will explore some of the general ideas of how process containment is performed with chroot and User-mode Linux, and how to help ensure that a successful attack on a jailed process does not affect the main system.

  • Secure OS Environments for Linux by Pedro Luz-Romero - June 3, 2003 

    In this paper I make a review of the main set of tools and resources available for Linux system administrators willing to build an operating system with enhanced security features that allow applications to run securely in a network accessible from the Internet.

  • Linux RootKits For Beginners - From Prevention to Removal by Jeromey Hannel - March 2, 2003 

    This paper provides an understanding of rootkits and will discuss how to monitor for a rootkit, and the steps taken to remove one.

  • Using Linux Scripts to Monitor Security by Harvey Newstrom - August 23, 2002 

    This paper will demonstrate how to create a generic tool using Linux scripting to enable network security monitoring.

  • Aggressive Patching and the Use of a Standard Build: An OpenBSD Example by Michael Sullenszino - April 5, 2002 

    This paper discusses the importance of a standard build and defines Aggressive Patching as a vital part of defense in depth. It then goes on to demonstrate how to implement Aggressive Patching by creating a Standard Build internet server farm and support structures that allow for automated patching and rapid deployment of hardened servers.

  • The Role of Bastille Linux in Information Security by Michael Grimaila - February 18, 2002 

    In this paper, the author will briefly examine the evolution of Linux, discuss its popularity, and examine in detail Bastille Linux, which is used to increase the security of RedHat and Mandrake Linux distributions.

  • An Introduction to the NSA's Security-Enhanced Linux: SELinux by Susan Rajnic - February 8, 2002 

    This paper will introduce the NSA's research project termed "Security-enhanced" Linux.

  • The Easily Recoverable CD-ROM Booted Linux Internet Server: A How-To by Brian Otto - January 21, 2002 

    The purpose of this paper is to detail the general steps to create a read-only Internet Server providing DNS and static web pages (bind and Apache).

  • Security Applications of Bootable Linux CD-ROMs by Richard Bajusz - November 30, 2001 

    This paper examines the security applications of bootable Linux CD-ROMs.

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Masters - This paper was created by a SANS Technology Institute student as part of their Master's curriculum.